Use The Enigmaze Notebook To Generate Strong Passwords And Manage Them

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Securing online accounts is easy enough – just create strong passwords and use different passwords for different accounts. Simple, right? Well, not quite. Remembering two passwords is one thing; remembering 50 different passwords on 50 different websites is a whole other thing entirely. You’ll need a secure password manager, a coded password card, or a notebook to keep them all in. The Enigmaze is one of the latter with a twist.

A physical notebook, it’s purpose-built to let you keep all of your passwords in a single place. Unlike regular notebooks, though, it comes with its own password generator, essentially serving as a physical all-in-one for all your password needs.

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Each spread on the Enigmaze has a page with three lined sections on top for writing down a website name, a username, and a short remark, with the opposite page serving as a place to jot down any notes. Below the lined top section sits a large grid of randomly-arranged letters, numbers, and symbols that you can use to generate a complex, impossible-to-guess password. To create a new password, simply draw a line through the grid, passing through the individual characters you want to include. You can use a pen or pencil to do this, although the included invisible ink marker should prove a more secure alternative. So that you can actually read the invisible password, each notebook includes a UV light keychain, which you shine on the grid to see the invisible ink line.

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Features include alphabetical tabs (3 sheets per letter), hardcover stitched binding, an elastic closure, and an expandable inner pocket for holding any small items. Sized to fit inside pockets, it measures just 4 x 5.7 inches.

A Kickstarter campaign is currently running for Enigmaze. Pledges to reserve a unit starts at $18.

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One Response

  1. William

    This is really cool and pretty impressive technology. For under $20 I’d give it a spin. But as of currently, I don’t have that many passwords. Maybe this will serve a greater purpose and market in servicing industrial organizations, government, and other larger businesses or corporations. I also fear the consequences of having one of these lost or stolen, and a hackers ability to more or less take over your life if they figure out how to crack it and make sense of it–or tie it back to you somehow. With that being said, I would have preferred a fingerprint feature then–they have it on the iPhone 5S!

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