Assemble Your Own Miniature Dinosaur Museum With Tinysaurs

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Building a real dinosaur museum will require serious skills and money, neither of which you probably have in spades.  These Tinysaurs, on the other hand, can let you fill an entire desktop with recreation dinosaur skeletons at only a fraction of the effort and the cost.  Of course, your co-workers aren't likely to pay a dollar to see 10 paper dinosaur bones inside your office cubicle, but it's an awesome feeling, nonetheless.

Created by artist Kelly Farrell who sells them through a NY-based outfit called Everything Tiny, the mini-dino remains are built out of sturdy paper material that you can assemble yourself.  Different types of dinosaurs are available, including Mammoths, Stegosauruses and the ever-popular T-Rex, along with other animals.

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The Tinysaurs come in three types of kits - Basic, DeLuxe and Under Glass.  Basic kit comes with  just bone parts (made from perforated, laser-cut oak tag board) and an instruction booklet.  The Deluxe model includes both, then throws in a pair of tweezers, glue and a tin box.  Under Glass is  the pre-built version of the miniature prehistoric bones, set inside a hand-blown glass bell jar.

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Looking at the parts, assembly doesn't seem difficult.  If you've got shaky hands, poor eyesight and an inexplicable aversion to working with small items, it might send you into fits, though.  Make sure you get the tweezer, glue and magnifying glass (plus headache pills - just in case) ready.

Want more dinos than they currently have on the website?  They do offer custom, laser-cut kits, so give them a call to request your favorite Jurassic monsters.  For existing designs, the Basic kits go for $7, the Deluxe for $16 and the Under Glass models for $60.  You can also get your own display case (for housing Tinysaurs or whatever else you want - you know, like fossilized head crabs)  for $12.

[Everything Tiny via Technabob]