CheckMe Is A Real Medical Tricorder You Can Buy

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No, it’s not quite as sophisticated as the tricorder in Star Trek. That, however, doesn’t make CheckMe any less impressive, with its ability to measure multiple vital health signals in as little as 20 seconds.

Made by Viatom Tech, the handheld device can be used to measure ECG, blood oxygenation (SpO2), blood pressure, temperature, and even oxygen desaturation during sleep, giving you a single tool to monitor various health parameters at home. That way, instead of driving to the doctor to get the same tests done, you can just do it yourself. Of course, you’ll still have to drive to the doctor once the readings point out you actually need medical attention anyway, but if you don’t, that’s plenty of time saved.

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Measuring about half the size of smartphone, the CheckMe makes it easy to keep around for running a personal check any time you feel the need. It comes with an LCD screen for navigating the UI, as well as displaying prompts about what you should do next, depending on what kind of reading you’re taking. Once a reading is finished, the results are shown on the same screen using a graphical waveform, which can be transmitted wirelessly to an accompanying mobile app as part of your records. Up to 10 hours worth of readings can be saved.

Aside from taking readings, the device can also function as a pedometer, although it might feel a bit like an ancient fitness band at this point. If you input your medicine intake schedule, the device can also display reminders, making for a dedicated health gadget that you can carry in your pocket.

The Viatom CheckMe will be sold in the US under the brand name Bodimetrics, which will launch in August, priced at $249.

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One Response

  1. Chris

    This is a really sweet, purposeful technology. A few weeks ago I was looking for a watch-based blood-pressure monitor, and unfortunately, to no avail could I find one. I find this especially significant who may be prone to high-blood pressure, or whom wishes to keep it low throughout the course of the day–and as much as possible during a workout within reason. While this is not a ‘watch-based’ device, it’s still really impressive. I can’t see a ton of purposes for this sort of technology, including the price, when it comes to an at-home consumer audience, but it’s definitely a first of it’s kind. It’s pretty awesome that it is app-friendly, and really seems to serve a broad array of medical-purposes. I see that it says it can hold up to 10-hours of memory, but how long does the actual battery last, and does it come with a charger or is it only battery powered?

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